Tuesday, March 31, 2020

Pet Portraits - Part Two

Here's part two of my series of favorite paintings with dogs at museums Kimberly and I have visited during our travels. There's so much to love in all of these. 

Painting photos by Saunders Fine Arts.

 "Vulturing" • Jamie Wyeth • 2010 • Mixed Media on Paper
Here is another by Jamie Wyeth at the Brandywine River Museum of Art. This piece gives me such a sense of anticipation. I'm waiting for the dog to run toward the bench at any moment.

 "Vulturing" Detail • Jamie Wyeth • 2010 • Mixed Media on Paper
The dog is painted with subtle value changes and stands out among the dark of the surrounding foliage. I love how Wyeth shaped the ears with strokes from the surrounding greens.  

"On The Scent" • John Sargent Noble • 1880 • Oil on Canvas
This piece by John Sargent Noble is part of the Museum of the Dog's collection. It's yet another piece marked by superb draftsmanship.

"On The Scent" Detail • John Sargent Noble • 1880 • Oil on Canvas
In contrast to the previous painting, this piece by Mary Cassatt at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C. is much more simple in its execution and yet the dog feels just as convincing. 

 "Young Girl at a Window" • Mary Cassatt • c. 1883-1884 • Oil on Canvas
While much more subtle, Cassatt also employs overlayed strokes, especially in the head of the dog. It's important to note that the values in the dog's face are very close to the values in the background. This prevents our eyes from following the gaze of the dog and keeps us focused on the dog overall.

 "Young Girl at a Window" Detail • Mary Cassatt • c. 1883-1884 • Oil on Canvas
Here is another piece at the Museum of the Dog, this one by Maud Earl. The painting is a perfect capture of a Pekingese, showcasing its varied textures and features.

 "Ti Ti" • Maud Earl • 1913 • Oil on Canvas
 The face is just barely there, with extremely tight values except for the eyes, and a few bits of reflection suggesting a wet nose.

 "Ti Ti" Detail • Maud Earl • 1913 • Oil on Canvas
The tail is beautifully painted with an explosion of quick and dynamic brushwork, suggesting both a softness and a lot of movement.

 "Ti Ti" Detail • Maud Earl • 1913 • Oil on Canvas
I found this one at the Museum of the Dog by Sir Edwin Henry Landseer to be a mixed bag. Excellent drawing skill, but too much detail in the Scottish Deerhound on the right. The face of the English Foxhound, on the other hand, is amazing.

"The Two Dogs" • Sir Edwin Henry Landseer • 1839 • Oil on Canvas

Much of the head is very thinly painted. Notice the canvas texture above the eye on the right. Landseer then uses the layered crosshatching technique to add volume and texture.

"The Two Dogs" Detail • Sir Edwin Henry Landseer • 1839 • Oil on Canvas
I'll end with one of my absolute favorites, but one that makes me laugh as well. John Singer Sargent's portrait of Beatrice Townsend at the National Gallery of Art uses the dog as ornamentation. The dog is definitely not the focal point of the painting, but I am completely entranced by it.

 "Miss Beatrice Townsend" • John Singer Sargent • 1882 • Oil on Canvas
Appearing to be related to Chewbacca (Chewie), the terrier is just dashed off. Sargent probably painted it in only a matter of minutes, and yet we get a clear sense of it. Notice the eyes. No detail at all, and yet they are there. I even get the sense that the dog is somewhat annoyed and struggling to get down, as Beatrice holds one of its paws in her hand.

 "Miss Beatrice Townsend" Detail • John Singer Sargent • 1882 • Oil on Canvas
 
© Patrick and Kimberly Saunders, Patrick Saunders Fine Arts, 2020. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s authors/owners is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Patrick Saunders for painted works, or to Kimberly Saunders for photographs and/or videos, with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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